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19 February 2004

BBC needs 'broadcast assassins'

The BBC is looking for members of the public to attend sessions with BBC management to discuss the impact of new technologies on viewing/listening behaviour. The questions will be stimulated by a 10-minute film which features several people who are perhaps unusual in their media consumption today but possibly represent the mainstream in a decade's time.

The four technologies of interest are:

  • Computer and video games
  • Peer to peer file sharing of television programmes
  • Time shifting of broadcast TV by recording it to a hard drive
  • Self publishing of original content on the internet

    If you do any of the above on a regular basis and you're interested in participating, please fill out this questionnaire (MS Word 36k) and email it back to Shazia Mustafa

    Availability: one or more afternoons March 8-12 2004
    Times: 1.30-4pm
    Venue: London, EC3 (near Tower Bridge)
    Participants receive £50 cash

  • I went to one of these sessions a couple of months ago and was both surprised and impressed by how effectively the invited 'broadcast assassins' could shake up BBC staffers' preconceptions of how people 'consume' media and what the future remit of the BBC might be.

    I am also intrigued by what seems to be the first attempt by BBC management to take advantage of the blogs kept by their staff. (I was asked to promote this recruitment effort on mine.) I'd always worried a little that my blog was illicit, and in some way in breach of the Producers' Guidelines (the writing on my blog doesn't meet the BBC's editorial standards but I am not a journalist and nor am I writing as the BBC; I speak as an individual... blah blah blah... and so my internal dialogue goes on...), so I've mostly avoided mentioning the BBC in any of my posts.

    Posted at 03:52 PM | Permalink

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